Natural Dyeing Resources

I've linked quite a few resources that would be useful to recreate natural dyes using the method we explored in class. Keep in mind, all these methods, tips, and tricks from various dyers work well in attaining botanical color. Some are more experimental and others are more precise. It is simply about finding what works for you!

MAIWA SCHOOL OF TEXTILES

This is by far my favorite resource and one I return to so often. It covers everything from mordants, scouring, testing ph levels, and dyeing. 

REBECCA DESNOS

Rebecca Desnos' Blog has simple recipes that are super easy to follow. The following links are just a few that I like and find relevant to this class. Sift through her blog for more experiments.

Indigo Salt Rub Method Akshay, you mentioned indigo, right? Here is one method.

Attaining Even Tones We dyed tiny pieces of fabric. Although the colors are true and replicable, making any larger piece of fabric an even tone can be more difficult than it seemed to be in the workshop. Here are some tips on making even tones on the next textile you dye!

Avocado Pits & Skins For a dreamy soft pink.

SUMAC DYE

There's an abundance of sumac in NYC and all over North America. The best time to forage for its leaves is late spring to mid-fall. This site has detailed recipes for attaining various colors from sumac. My favorite is burgundy and gray on cotton.

PIONEER THINKING

This site definitely lacks information, BUT if you take what you learned from the class and play with varying plants, you will make a rainbow of colors. I simply like the huge list they provide with possible plant matter for dyeing.

WILD COLOURS

The orange column on the left has a plethora of info and recipes on traditional natural dyes, such as madder root, indigo, brazilwood, cutch, cochineal, etc.

BOTANICAL COLORS

Since we have an abundance of dyestuffs in our fridge and in our backyards, I really encourage using what you already have to create color. If you would like to purchase dyes that do not grow in your region, Botanical Colors is a great source.

WILD EARTH TEXTILES

Another transparent and reliable source for buying dried plants specifically meant for dyeing. They are grown right in their back yard and based in Western North Carolina!

WALNUT INK

As you may have noticed, we took a few shortcuts in the process of creating inks due to time constraints. The link above gives the most similar recipe to the more time-consuming walnut ink I create for my self. You may take a similar approach to create ink with other plant materials.

DYE COLOURS FOR ECO PRINTS

This is a huge list that has been created by fellow natural dyer Wendy Fe. Here you will find a list of dyestuffs categorized by the color they yield specifically for eco printing aka bundle dyeing.

ECO COLOUR BY INDIA FLINT

This book covers the process of eco-printing with leaves, roots, and barks. She dedicates this book specifically to exploring eucalyptus bundle dyeing and nontoxic mordants.